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Thursday, 14 November 2013

History of Master Blaster - Sachin Tendulkar

Name : Sachin Tendulkar
Full name : Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar
Nick name :The Master Blaster, The Little Champion, The Bombay Bomber
Height : 5′4”
Born : 24-04-1973
Birth place: Bombay, India
Test Debut: Pakistan at Karachi, 1st Test, 1989/90
ODI Debut: Pakistan at Gujranwala, 2nd ODI, 1989/90
1st Class Debut: 1988
Major Teams: Mumbai, Yorkshire, India
Known As: Sachin Tendulkar
Batting Style: Right Hand Bat
Bowling Style: Right Arm Off Break, Leg Break, Right Arm Medium, Leg Break Googly
Marital Status: Married
Wifeï Name: Anjali Tendulkar
Children: Two (One Boy and One Girl)
Girlï Name: Sarah Tendulkar
Boy Name: Arjun Tendulkar
Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar (born 24 April 1973) is an Indian cricketer. He holds several batting records, including the most Test centuries and the most one-day international centuries, and was rated in 2002 by Wisden as the second greatest Test batsman ever, after Sir Don Bradman[1]. He received the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna, India’s highest sporting honour, for 1997-1998, and the civilian award Padma Shri in 1999. Tendulkar was a Wisden Cricketer of the Year in 1997.
Early days
Born in Mumbai (then Bombay) into a middle-class family, Sachin Tendulkar was named after his family’s favourite music director Sachin Dev Burman. He went to Sharadashram Vidyamandir School where he started his cricketing career under coach Ramakant Achrekar. While at school, he was involved in a mammoth 664 run partnership in a Harris Shield game with friend and team mate Vinod Kambli. In 1988/1989, he scored 100 not-out in his first first-class match, for Bombay against Gujarat. At 15 years and 232 days he was the youngest to score a century on debut.
International career
Sachin played his first international match against Pakistan in Karachi in 1989, facing the likes of Wasim Akram, Imran Khan, Abdul Qadir, and Waqar Younis. He made just 15 runs, being bowled by Waqar Younis, who also made his debut in that match. It was an inauspicious start, but Tendulkar followed it up with his maiden Test fifty a few days later at Faisalabad. His One-day International (ODI) debut on December 18 was equally disappointing, where he was dismissed without scoring a run, again by Waqar Younis. The series was followed by a non-descript tour of New Zealand in which he fell for 88 in a Test match, John Wright, who would later coach India, pouching the catch that prevented Tendulkar from becoming the youngest centurion in Test cricket. The long anticipated maiden Test century came in England’s tour in 1990 but the other scores were not remarkable. Tendulkar truly came into his own in the 1991-1992 tour of Australia that included a brilliant century on the fast and bouncy track at Perth. He has been Man of the Match 11 times in Test matches and Man of the Series twice, both times in the Border-Gavaskar Trophy against Australia.


His first ODI century came on September 9, 1994 against Australia in Sri Lanka at Colombo. It had taken Tendulkar 79 ODIs to score a century.
Sachin Tendulkar is the only player to score a century while making his Ranji Trophy, Duleep Trophy and Irani Trophy debut.
Wisden named Tendulkar one of the Cricketers of the Year in 1997, the first calendar year in which he scored 1,000 Test runs. He repeated the feat in 1999, 2001, and 2002.
Tendulkar also holds the record for scoring 1,000 ODI runs in a calendar year. He has done it six times – 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000 and 2003. In 1998 he made 1,894 ODI runs, still the record for ODI runs by any batsman in any given calendar year.

While not a regular bowler, Tendulkar has 37 wickets in 132 tests.
Highlights of Tendulkar’s Test career include:

* Rated as the second best batsman of all time (next to Don Bradman) by Wisden [1][3]
* Highest number of Test centuries (35), overtaking Sunil Gavaskar’s record (34) on 10 December 2005 vs Sri Lanka in Delhi.
* Played in the highest number of Cricket Grounds – he has played Test Cricket on 52 different grounds, ahead of Azharuddin (48), Kapil Dev (47), Inzamam-ul-Haq (46) and Wasim Akram (45).
* He is the fastest to score 10,000 runs in Test cricket history. He holds this record along with Brian Lara. Both of them achieved this feat in 195 innings.
* 4th highest tally of runs in Test cricket (10,668) (updated on Feb 16 2007)
* Career Average 54.71 – Has the highest average among those who have scored over 10,000 Test runs (updated on Feb 16 2007)
* Second Indian to make over 10,000 runs in Test matches.
* Has 37 Test wickets (14 Dec 2005)
* Second fastest player to reach 9000 runs (Brian Lara made 9000 in 177 innings, Sachin in 179.)
Highlights of Tendulkar’s ODI career include:
* Played more matches than any other cricketer, 381 matches. (updated on Feb 16 2007)
* Most Man of the Match (52) awards (updated on Feb 16 2007)
* Appeared on the most grounds (89 different grounds)
* Most runs – 14,783 (updated on Feb 16 2007)
* Most centuries (41) (updated on Feb 16 2007)
* Most centuries vs. Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe.
* First cricketer to cross 10,000-run mark in ODIs
* Only cricketer to cross 14,000-run mark in ODIs
* Only player to have over 100 innings of 50+ runs as of February, 2006
* Over 100 wickets – 147 (updated on Feb 16 2007)
* Highest batting average among batsmen with over 10,000 ODI runs (updated on Feb 16 2007)
* Highest individual score among Indian batsmen (186* against New Zealand at Hyderabad in 1999)
* Holds the record for scoring 1,000 ODI runs in a calendar year. He has done it six times – 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000 and 2003.
* In 1998 he made 1,894 ODI runs, still the record for ODI runs by any batsman in any given calendar year.
* In 1998 he hit 9 ODI centuries, the highest by any player in an year.
World Cup
* Most runs (1732 at an average of 59.72) in World Cup Cricket History
* Player Of The Tournament in the 2003 Cricket World Cup.
* 673 runs in 2003 World Cup, highest by any one in a single Cricket World Cup
Miscellaneous
* Sachin Tendulkar is the first batsman to have been declared run out by a third umpire in 1992 against South Africa in South Africa.
* He was the first overseas cricketer to play for Yorkshire CCC in 1992.
* Oddly, Wisden does not include any innings by Tendulkar among its list of 100 greatest Test batting performances.
Criticism and recent performance
The case against Sachin Tendulkar’s recent performances was summed up by Wisden Cricketers’ Almanack in its 2005 edition: “Apart from a glorious, nothing-to-lose 55 against Australia on a Mumbai terrortrack, watching Tendulkar became a colder experience: after his humbling 2003, he seemed to reject his bewitching fusion of majesty and human frailty in favour of a mechanical, robotic accumulation.”
The criticism must be seen against the backdrop of Tendulkar’s performance through the years 1994-1999, coinciding with his physical peak, at age 20 through 25. Tendulkar was told to open the batting at Auckland against New Zealand in 1994 [4]. He went on to make 82 runs off 49 balls. This was the beginning of a glorious period, culminating in the Australian tour of 1998-1999, following which Australian spinner Shane Warne ruefully joked that he was having nightmares about his Indian nemesis.


A chronic back problem flared up when Pakistan toured India in 1999, with India losing the historic Test at Chepauk despite a gritty century from Tendulkar himself. Worse was to come as Professor Ramesh Tendulkar, Sachin’s father, died in the middle of the 1999 cricket World Cup. Tendulkar, succeeding Mohammad Azharuddin as captain, then led India on a tour of Australia, where the visitors were comprehensively beaten 3-0 [6] by the newly-crowned world champions. Tendulkar resigned, and Sourav Ganguly took over as captain in 2000.

Tendulkar made 673 runs in 11 matches in the 2003 World Cup, helping India reach the finals. While Australia retained the trophy that it had won in 1999, Tendulkar was given the Man of the Series award.


The drawn series as India toured Australia in 2003-2004 saw Tendulkar making his mark in the last Test of the series, with a double century in Sydney. The series was tied 1-1, with Rahul Dravid taking the Man of the Series award.

Tennis elbow then took its toll on Tendulkar, leaving him out of the side for the first two Tests when Australia toured India in 2005. He played a part in the facesaving Indian victory in Mumbai, though Australia had already taken the series 2-1, with the Chennai Test drawn.
Of late, as Wisden noted, Tendulkar has not been his old aggressive self. Expert opinion is divided on whether this is due to his increasing years or the lingering after-effects of injuries over 17 years at the highest level. On 10 December, 2005, at Feroz Shah Kotla, he delighted fans with a record-breaking 35th Test century, against the Sri Lankans. But doubts were raised once again when he averaged a mere 21 over three Test innings when India toured Pakistan in 2006.


On 6 February 2006, Tendulkar scored his 39th ODI hundred, in a match against Pakistan. Tendulkar now has 16 more ODI tons than the man who is second on the list of ODI century-makers, Sourav Ganguly. He followed with a run-a-ball 42 in the second ODI against Pakistan on February 11, 2006, and then a truly masterly 95 in hostile conditions on 13 February, 2006 in Lahore.
On 19 March 2006, after scoring an unconvincing 1 off 21 balls against England in the first innings of the third Test in his home ground, Wankhede, Tendulkar was booed off the ground by a section of the crowd[7], the first time that he has ever faced such flak. While cheered on when he came for his second innings, Tendulkar was to end the three-Test series without a single half-century to his credit, and news of a shoulder operation raised more questions about his longevity. Geoffrey Boycott was brutal in his assessment: “Sachin Tendulkar is in the worst form of his career…Now that he’s going to sit out for a further two months, I don’t think he can ever come back to regain what he once had.”
Personal life

Sachin Tendulkar married Anjali Mehta, the paediatrician daughter of Gujarati industrialist Anand Mehta, in 1995, some years after they were introduced by mutual friends. They have two children, Sara (born October 1997) and Arjun (born 23 September, 2000). Tendulkar sponsors 200 under-privileged children every year through Apnalaya, a Mumbai-based NGO associated with his mother-in-law, Annabel Mehta. He is reluctant to speak about this, or other charitable activities, choosing to preserve the sanctity of his personal life despite the overwhelming media interest in him. Tendulkar has been seen taking his Ferrari 360 Modena for late-night drives in Mumbai.

Thursday, 7 November 2013

Sachin Tendulkar final match for India in Mumbai - Live Watching

Sachin Tendulkar final match for India in Mumbai - Live Watching
Fans on a ‘pilgrimage’ as Sachin plays his last match in Kolkata
Sachin at Castrol Golden Spanner Awards (crop).jpg
Sachin Tendulkar will end his prolific 24-year international career in his 200th and final Test match in Mumbai against the West Indies
Kolkata: Indian batting legend Sachin Tendulkar is playing his last competitive cricket match in Kolkata, at the famous Eden Gardens stadium.

And the city seems to have gone crazy to give farewell to the man who helped India become a cricketing ‘superpower’.

In the morning, fans had lined up at the stadium to catch a glimpse of Tendulkar who is playing his penultimate, 199th Test match against West Indies here.

More people could be seen outside the stadium than inside. There were long queues and eager fans waiting to get in to catch a glimpse of the Master.

Visitors West Indies are batting first on Day 1 after winning the toss.

During the morning rush, fans were not even ready to spare time and speak to the waiting media; they appeared more concerned about entering the stadium.

One of the causes behind the mad rush is that there was a serious crunch for tickets for the match.

Only 5000 tickets were available for the general public, with over 60,000 tickets being distributed among Board members.

Many fans had to go back home from the ticket counters disappointed when the ticket sale was on.

Sachin meanwhile did not disappoint the fans, taking one wicket during the course of West Indies’ batting.

Watching Sachin play for one last time in Kolkata is equivalent to a "pilgrimage" for some fans.

"It is a pilgrimage...first day of the historic Test match. Watching the Master for one last time. Feeling emotional..," said banker Gourav 'Tendulkar' Chakraborty, who took five days’ leave to follow the Test match.

"We are from Assam and we have come all the way on a Sachin pilgrimage," said a group from the northeastern state.

"It is an experience of a lifetime...we are here for Sachin...even if he doesn't score a century we won't mind...we just want to watch him play for the last time," said a fan at the venue
The security agencies in Mumbai are treating Sachin Tendulkar's 200th and final Test match at the Wankhede Stadium here like a World Cup final. On Wednesday, Mumbai Cricket Association officials and senior officers of the Mumbai Police discussed elaborate security measures to ensure that the high-profile match to be attended by the who's who of the country passed off incident free.

The bustling city of Mumbai has always been a soft target for terror groups. The Champions League T20 championship was cancelled after the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks by Pakistani gunmen. In July 2011, a series of explosions rocked the city leaving at least 26 people dead. Tendulkar's 200th game is being seen as more than just a Test match and hence the attention from all security agencies is understandable.

Among major steps, four sets of Quick Response Teams, armed with automatic weapons, will escort the players. The police will also post liaison officers with both the Indian and the West Indian squads. Parking restrictions in and around the Wankhede Stadium and specific entrance for players and VVIPs are part of the security measures.

Anti-sabotage measures will also be in place as part of the security bandobast. Even the caterers who will bring in food for spectators and players will have restricted entry and will be frisked. Except authorized personnel, no Private Security Officers with weapons will be allowed entry in the core areas of the stadium.

Cricket players have been at the receiving end of terrorist strikes. In March 2009, at least six Sri Lankan cricketers were injured after gunmen opened fire on the team bus at Lahore. Six Pakistani policemen and two civilians were killed when 12 masked gunmen on rickshaws attacked with guns, grenades and rockets. The Sri Lankan team bus came under fire as the players headed to the Gaddafi Stadium for the third day of the second Test against Pakistan. Mumbai Police is taking no chances with Tendulkar's mega match.